ESSEX STREET
  • Cameron Rowland
    Loot, 2014
    Cut and dented copper tube, mail crate
    12 x 19 x 13 inches (30.48 x 48.26 x 33.02 cm)

    At some point basic utilities like electricity and water were services controlled by the state, because they relied so heavily on public infrastructure. More and more these flows are valved by private corporations. When abandoned buildings are broken into and stripped of their copper piping, it is sold to scrap yards, where it is cut down, and often nested and dented. This cut copper was bought after initial processing from a scrap yard. Copper has a function, its base material has an inherent value.
  • Cameron Rowland
    Zero Tolerance, 2015
    5 gallon bucket, squeegee, washer fluid, water 
    19 x 12 x 12 inches 

    “‘As minute a problem as that might seem in the overall scope of a city with 2,000 murders, squeegees are of great significance,’ said Mr. Bratton ‘because like fare evasion and like disorder on the subways, it's that type of activity that is generating fear.’” Steven Lee Myers, “Squeegees’ Rank High on Next Police Commissioner’s Priority List,” New York Times, December 4, 1993.
  • Cameron Rowland
    Zero Tolerance, 2015
    Detail
  • Cameron Rowland
    49-51 Chambers Street - Basement, New York, NY 10007, 2014
    Wooden table top, base, hardware
    31 x 42 x 42 inches (78.74 x 106.68 x 106.68 cm)

    Public Surplus is a private auction system that sells government property to private buyers. This circular wooden table was bought at auction from Public Surplus. It was used in the building at 49-51 Chambers Street in New York City, when it was owned by the Mayor’s Office of New York. The City purchased the building in 1965. The building was sold in 2013 and is now privately owned. Everything unclaimed in the building was sold in 2014 via Public Surplus.
  • Cameron Rowland
    Handpunch 1-5, 2014-15
    5 Photographs
    Each Photograph: 14 x 10.16 inches (35.56 x 25.81 cm)
    Each Framed: 16.75 x 12.75 x 1.25 inches (42.55 x 32.39 x 3.18 cm)
    Edition of 5 plus 2 AP

    In businesses where employees' time is one of the most valuable assets, the Handpunch time clock secures this time. Manufactured by Schlage (the American lock company) the Handpunch uses a biometric reading of employees right hand to inhibit false clock-ins and payment for false hours. Biometric recognition was developed to replace photography as a superior form of criminal indexing. 
  • Cameron Rowland
    Handpunch 1-5, 2014-15
    Detail
  • Cameron Rowland
    90, 45, 15, 2014
    Catalytic converter, trash bag
    18 x 12 x 10 inches (45.72 x 30.48 x 25.40 cm)

    Catalytic converters are one of the most valuable scrapped car parts. Used catalytic converters are illegal to resell or reuse. They contain various combinations of Rhodium, Platinum, and Palladium that filter exhaust. Each model converter has a different value. This catalytic converter has been quoted at $45 by the author of the Book of Numbers and at $15 at a scrap yard. It was bought for $90.
  • Cameron Rowland
    Bait, Inc, ESSEX STREET, New York, 2014
    Installation view
  • Cameron Rowland
    Pass-Thru, 2014
    Acrylic, hardware, 24-hour rotator disc
    23 x 20 x 21 inches (58.42 x 50.80 x 53.34 cm)
    Rental

    In some places, businesses use a pass-thru, to pass cash or goods back and forth; this could be at a bank or a liquor store. The highest standard of pass-thru use bullet proof glass, although this material is far too expensive to be used as a protective measure by those business where it might be most effective. Therein plastic is used in place of bullet proof glass. They are either made by a manufacturer or by the shop owner. This Pass-Thru was made by Rowland.

Maxwell Graham Gallery Valerie Snobeck Jason Loebs Caleb Considine Peter Fend